CYBERSECURITY AND PRIVACY WITH FRANCESCA BOSCO: A COMPLEX WORLD


A complex world

Francesca Bosco, UNICRI Programme Officer, United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute, talks about hackers, cybercriminals, profile crackers, cyberwarriors, cyberspies and organized criminal groups.

Signe Lundblad

Privacy vs. security will remain a hot topic. Why? Because your information will likely pop up in more and more places. Your world is getting more connected, not less, and your information has value. People will try to profit from it in legal and illegal ways. The best advice about privacy vs. security: Take care of both.

Lalita Demetriou

In response to János Pataky

Many organizations also fail to consider how telecoms, and increasingly, video factor into their overarching cyber-security strategy. Of course, it is essential for any business to have effective communications, from informal conversations between colleagues, to confidential client discussions. However, voice and video are just as susceptible to hacks as other systems.

This is especially true when it comes to VoIP. Every communication made over IP – including voice - is potentially valuable to hackers and open to attack. This isn’t something organizations tend to consider when using Skype, for example, but voice and video should be treated with the same attention as any other security and data risk.

Stojan Mikhailov

In response to Michael Dunst

Cloud computing is convenient, increasingly popular, and is generally considered to be secure. However, this is not always the case. In a public cloud, all data is stored within the provider’s network, and, as such, is open to attack. Even a private cloud, which is not open to the world, with data stored in a private network, is still not infallible.

As both public and private clouds are essentially centralized systems with just one point of vulnerability, it is relatively easy for someone to ‘leave the door open’ either through incompetence or maliciously.

János Pataky

Many organizations also fail to consider how telecoms, and increasingly, video factor into their overarching cyber-security strategy. Of course, it is essential for any business to have effective communications, from informal conversations between colleagues, to confidential client discussions. However, voice and video are just as susceptible to hacks as other systems.

Michael Dunst

Cloud computing is convenient, increasingly popular, and is generally considered to be secure. However, this is not always the case. In a public cloud, all data is stored within the provider’s network, and, as such, is open to attack. Even a private cloud, which is not open to the world, with data stored in a private network, is still not infallible.

Fabricio Ruiz

The way people work is rapidly evolving, enabled in large part by advances in technology. In many ways, this is a hugely positive thing as employees are able to work anytime, anywhere. However, the use of personal smartphones, tablets and laptops to carry out business does increase the risk of data loss – either through human error or by providing a way in for cyber criminals.

Teresa Guerrero

Common methods attackers use to control computers or networks include viruses, worms, spyware, Trojans, and ransomware. Viruses and worms can self-replicate and damage files or systems, while spyware and Trojans are often used for surreptitious data collection. Ransomware waits for an opportunity to encrypt all the user’s information and demands payment to return access to the user. Malicious code often spreads via an unsolicited email attachment or a legitimate-looking download that actually carries a malware payload.

Kaan Buğra Kundakçı

Disaster recovery and business continuity define how an organization responds to a cyber-security incident or any other event that causes the loss of operations or data. Disaster recovery policies dictate how the organization restores its operations and information to return to the same operating capacity as before the event. Business continuity is the plan the organization falls back on while trying to operate without certain resources.

Zoe Miller

In response to tobias sorensen

I think it is impossible to attaining 100% security while still staying connected. It is like all other thing that we do, you'll naver have the totaly security, it is a part of our life, and since these systems are complex and made by many different companies, there will always be someone able to sneak into someone's computer or phone and cause damage, steal data and all the rest.


 

There is no way to stay safe in the internet, the only ones that know how to say safe are the same people that give up trouble in the internet and steal our data. Imagine you are a hacker but not the real sense, you are a person that has to pass a wall, not to do cyber robberies. How many way of passing through the wall can you think of in the first minute? Now imagine you are a cyber security expect again not in the real sense and you protect what is behind this wall. This time you have to think what might occur to me to use in order to pass through the wall.

This is the problem with good and evil, evil is always a step ahead because you don't have to act upon someone elses' actions, you have a much simpler problem.

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