SOCIAL AND NEW MEDIA WITH LUCIANO FLORIDI: DIGITAL DEMOCRACY


Digital Democracy

Luciano Floridi, Professor of Philosophy and Ethics of Information and Director of the Digital Ethics Lab, at the Oxford Internet Institute, talks about politics, digital tech, social media, platforms and information pollution.

Mohammed Hussain

The process of digitalization offers the opportunity to foster a European public sphere by bringing people closer together and better connecting people across borders. In this way, a European space for communication on matters of common interest can be created. Creating and improving appropriate digital tools makes it easier to have large-scale public debates and to take collective action on a European level.

Sigfrid Nilsen

It has been said that it is “the engagement of citizens that gives democracy its legitimacy, as well as its vitality.” But the current lack of citizen participation and existing apathy politically can be said to be a threat to its legitimacy.

Gertruda Filipowski

Today, the Internet (along with the rise of digital media) is impacting everything from the way we shop, read the news, and live our everyday lives to the ways in which businesses, parliaments, and governments work, thus altering the fabric of social, political, and economic institutions. These digital transformations have created new challenges and opportunities for politicians, journalists, political institutions, and the (legacy) media from Internet regulation to reconnecting and engaging with citizens and audiences.

Oliver Baier

In response to Edita Hornik

The scandals concerning private data harvesting by different tools and apps on social media platforms, along with online communities of trolls and fake news with the purpose of sabotaging and tilting political processes, are among many examples that reveal how easily a digital society can render people and groups defenceless. 

Edita,

Just to add on to your post, if anyone does not know what an Internet troll is, here you can find one of the best definitions available on the web.

Edita Hornik

The scandals concerning private data harvesting by different tools and apps on social media platforms, along with online communities of trolls and fake news with the purpose of sabotaging and tilting political processes, are among many examples that reveal how easily a digital society can render people and groups defenceless. 

Slobodan Pavlicic

In response to Fujiko Nakayama

In the past, the use of digital technology in the democratic process has been focused on the use of online voting however in recent years the discussion has shifted toward an expanded role for technology in the democratic process. This discussion has now moved past a focus on the digitisation of existing processes to the reinvention of various democratic institutions and methods.

Commentators have disagreed about the effect and importance of the internet and related technologies for politics and government. Utopian accounts predict the transformation of political life through Internet-based mediation, with ‘peer production’ and on-line networks enhancing political participation and technological innovation driving policy innovation. In contrast, dystopian arguments emphasise the risks and dangers of technologically strengthened government and the ‘database state’.

George Waters

Digital democracy might involve the greater use of the internet to gauge public opinion by mini referenda and e-petitions, the use of the internet to activate political debate via social media and online forums, the incorporation of mobile phone or hand-held devices to involve the public in decision making at various levels, and the replacement of traditional voting methods with e-technology solutions.

Fujiko Nakayama

In the past, the use of digital technology in the democratic process has been focused on the use of online voting however in recent years the discussion has shifted toward an expanded role for technology in the democratic process. This discussion has now moved past a focus on the digitisation of existing processes to the reinvention of various democratic institutions and methods.

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Helga Breitner

This discussion on Digital Democracy brings me to another issue that I think is not stressed enough: the current enthusiasm around technology and open government strikes me due to its lack of historical perspective. And, if history serves as any guide, advocates in the open government space would fare better in managing their (and others’) expectations about what can and cannot be achieved by technology.

Dorothea Petrescu

In response to Fabricio Ruiz

Dorothea,

It is interesting to note that European countries have so far had very different approaches to the opportunities offered by e-democracy, depending on how concerned they are about the risk of hacking.

The Dutch government, referring to the possibility of hacking, announced that all casted votes will be counted manually for the general elections taking place last Wednesday. Until 2007, voting machines where used in Netherlands at the polling stations but it was then proved that these machines could be easily manipulated and since then e-voting is banned in the country.  France has allowed e-voting in legislative elections for its citizens abroad since 2012 but dropped the possibility this year, citing cybersecurity fears. France's legislative elections take place in June.  In Estonia legally binding remote e-voting for local, national and EU elections has been carried out eight times since 2005. So far, no hacking has been reported.

Fabricio,

The digital revolution has no doubt disrupted politics. But has it enhanced democracy? In recent years there’s been a growing disconnect between the pace of digital development and the way political and government processes work. The internet has fundamentally changed the way we go about our social and economic lives. However, the way we participate in institutional government processes, like elections and public consultations, is not significantly different from the non-internet age.

Fabricio Ruiz

In response to Dorothea Petrescu

Some researchers argue that the field of e-democracy has generally failed to live up to its own reformist rhetoric.  They claim there are instances where instead of reforming government processes through technology, edemocracy projects have tended to focus either on lowering the costs and increasing the efficiency of existing political processes or on analysing the civic participation that occurs outside of purposebuilt e-democracy platforms.

Dorothea,

It is interesting to note that European countries have so far had very different approaches to the opportunities offered by e-democracy, depending on how concerned they are about the risk of hacking.

The Dutch government, referring to the possibility of hacking, announced that all casted votes will be counted manually for the general elections taking place last Wednesday. Until 2007, voting machines where used in Netherlands at the polling stations but it was then proved that these machines could be easily manipulated and since then e-voting is banned in the country.  France has allowed e-voting in legislative elections for its citizens abroad since 2012 but dropped the possibility this year, citing cybersecurity fears. France's legislative elections take place in June.  In Estonia legally binding remote e-voting for local, national and EU elections has been carried out eight times since 2005. So far, no hacking has been reported.

Dorothea Petrescu

Some researchers argue that the field of e-democracy has generally failed to live up to its own reformist rhetoric.  They claim there are instances where instead of reforming government processes through technology, edemocracy projects have tended to focus either on lowering the costs and increasing the efficiency of existing political processes or on analysing the civic participation that occurs outside of purposebuilt e-democracy platforms.

YogaFan

@Анета, thank you for the link.  The article was very informative and user-friendly.

Анета Владимирова

Digital Democracy is sometimes also referred to as Internet Democracy, or even e-Democracy.  They all refer to the same thing: using IT as well as communication technology to promote democracy.  Here is an in-depth article on what it is and how it works.  

Mathilde A. Allafort

The simile with the bottle of wine and the drop of vinegar will stay with me for a while.  It was a strong and quite appropriate way to emphasize a point.

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