SOCIAL AND NEW MEDIA WITH RASMUS KLEIS NIELSEN: THE CHALLENGES


The challenges

Rasmus Kleis Nielsen, Director of Research at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism talks about payed and second rank news, platforms and the crucial importance of media literacy.

Nevenka Predrag Branković

An open Facebook profile is arguably a stalker’s dream, with all manner of personal details, from current city of residence to phone numbers and photos available to browse and swipe.  And on Twitter, many users regularly post pictures with their location tagged, all of which allows for people to know their whereabouts with relative accuracy, as well as let savvy burglars know you’re not at home.

Oliver Baier

Social media is not just about posting and then waiting for results. Social is about Social. It’s about discussing and debating new ideas, looking for users to engage with and sharing feedback on your product/service. Not to mention asking what prospects are looking for next and what their desires are (which helps identify user personas).

Alex Tetradze

In response to Prof. Dr.-Ing. Helga Breitner

Although the real-world effects of ‘fake news’ or disinformation campaigns are difficult to tangibly calculate there is no doubt that they are out there. Creating an army of Twitter accounts to promote a certain line of messaging or setting up a blog with the intention to deceive is incredibly simple – anyone with the will can do it.  Much of the attention on this has centred on Russia but the fact is there are states in the west that surreptitiously push political messaging as well. Before the Democrat email hack this was generally known as astroturfing, with China, the USA, and Britain all known to participate in massaging discourse online.
 

Helga,

You make some good points.  In general "fake news" is journalism that consists of deliberate misinformation, news whose main purpose is to distort "the truth for emotional persuasion, seeking to drive action." More recently it has become a catch-all term used to discredit stories, and in the political arena to influence the political process and elections in the U.S and abroad.

Slobodan Pavlicic

In response to Rosanne Ostberg

I am concerned about the polarization in the way news get delivered nowadays.  I cannot help but wonder whether we will one day see a situation where people get second-rate news if it is free and first-rate news if it is paid.

The algorithms social-media sites deploy to deliver personalized content clearly have a large role in making sure users encounter only information that agrees with their existing beliefs.

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Helga Breitner

Although the real-world effects of ‘fake news’ or disinformation campaigns are difficult to tangibly calculate there is no doubt that they are out there. Creating an army of Twitter accounts to promote a certain line of messaging or setting up a blog with the intention to deceive is incredibly simple – anyone with the will can do it.  Much of the attention on this has centred on Russia but the fact is there are states in the west that surreptitiously push political messaging as well. Before the Democrat email hack this was generally known as astroturfing, with China, the USA, and Britain all known to participate in massaging discourse online.
 

Fujiko Nakayama

False news is more novel than true news, and that may be why we share the false much faster and more widely. Prominent responses to false news include surprise, fear and disgust. True news tends to be met with sadness, joy, anticipation and trust. Humans are more likely than automated processes to be responsible for the spread of fake news.

YogaFan

In response to George Waters

I am interested in finding out more about how ranking algorithms influence what news gets delivered to end-users and the manner in which it gets delivered.  Can someone with experience elaborate on the further?

George,

Google has patented a news ranking algorithm.  The metrics cited in the patent application include: the number of articles produced by a news organization during a given time period; the average length of an article from a news source; and the importance of coverage from the news source.  Other metrics include a breaking news score, usage patterns, human opinion, circulation statistics and the size of the staff associated with a particular news operation.  Also factored in are the number of news bureaus a news source has, the number of original named entities used in stories, breadth of coverage, international diversity and even writing style.

Baldur Helgason

Talk about fake news...have you all heard of Conspiracy 58?  The 1958 FIFA World Cup was staged in Sweden.  Conspiracy 58 tried to convince people in the host country that the tournament never happened. It explored claims that the 1958 tournament was staged by FIFA and the CIA to test the power of television to influence people.  Some of these claims included that you could see the Los Angeles skyline behind stadiums in grainy footage and shadows cast by players were in the wrong position for Swedish summer.  Here is more info on this incredible experiment.

Vincent Fournier

@Guido: fake news are there since the beginning of time and have many different names: April's fool, cospiracy, propaganda.


One of the most famous is the presence of channels on Mars, reported by astronomer Schiaparelli in 1877, which led to the creation of the martians and all subsequence Sci-fi literature.


We will never get rid of them, but we can try to spot them and in this AI could play a great role.


 

Rosanne Ostberg

I am concerned about the polarization in the way news get delivered nowadays.  I cannot help but wonder whether we will one day see a situation where people get second-rate news if it is free and first-rate news if it is paid.

Aleksey Tyomkin

It is mind boggling how quickly digital media have evolved over the past two decades.  Digital media are no longer just a supplement but rather the main type of media people use today.

George Waters

I am interested in finding out more about how ranking algorithms influence what news gets delivered to end-users and the manner in which it gets delivered.  Can someone with experience elaborate on the further?

Guido Romeo

@lucas : yes there is a great variety of attitudes to digital media but it's quite mundane to see it as an age dependent differnce. One of the most interesting points Nielsen makes is actually that of "media literacy" and how this correlates to the culture, history and level of education of a population. 


What is interesting, for instance is that Germans do not seem to buy into the fake-news driven propaganda that seems to be ever pervasive while Italians and British are actually much more senistive.

Lucas Vermeulen

It is a fact that the way people view digital media largely depends on our age and on what we have grown up with.  Different generations trust social media differently.  Younger people seem to be more trusting of social media and less concerned with their privacy.

jet91

Digital technologies perform better than humans in many areas, it would be fun to have a comparison between the two in all the areas, like it was a basket match. Like:


driving: Human 83 - Machines 17


swimming: Human 100 - Machines 0


walking: Human 54 - Machines 46


play chess: Human 31 - Machines 69


In this rankings everyone can participate, and with historical data we could see over time as the number changes


 

Please login or register to leave a response.