SOCIAL AND NEW MEDIA WITH RASMUS KLEIS NIELSEN: A NEW INFORMATION AGE


A new information age

Rasmus Kleis Nielsen, Director of Research at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism talks about digital media and the news, algorithmic serendipity, echo chambers and filter bubbles.

Simon Kremer

Besides Snapchat, Facebook and Twitter have also played important roles in making the news more accessible and attractive to millennials. Twitter features “trending” hashtags that often highlight important national and global events. The website and app also highlight an array of news updates, events, and hot topics through their “What’s Happening” portion of their landing page.

Paskal Dulev

In response to Arthur Lémieux

Interactive content has led to journalism becoming attractive to millennials again. A study conducted by Wibbitz found that 40 percent of millennials rely on digital outlets for their news, while 23 percent primarily get their news from social media. Snapchat jumped on this finding and added news outlets to Discover.

An overarching theme in this article is interaction. Millennials love to interact with content, so why not the news? A big step in this new territory occurred when the Wall Street Journal joined Snapchat. CNN and National Geographic are among the 24 other media companies that have also joined the application in hopes of delivering journalistic content to this demographic.

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