INTERNET OF THINGS WITH EVA KAILI: NEW OPPORTUNITIES


New opportunities

Eva Kaili, Member of the European Parliament, Chair of STOA, the European Parliament’s Science and Technology Options Assessment body talks about regilation, distributed ledgers, data ownership and portability.

Simon Winkler

In order to make buildings more efficient and competitive, digitization of housing plays a key role. Here the Internet of Things comes into play, once a building has been digitized, data and information are constantly transmitted about the operation of all the disciplines integrated in a building: from the weather, to protection against fires. For example, there are intelligent management platforms that help the user to manage, directly from the mobile, the environment of their offices according to their needs.

Lorena Surbeck

Internet of Things, an area where power relationships are ambiguous and the exact use of technology yet undetermined, is a fruitful realm for the technique of design fiction – or seeing design as a means of speculating about how things could be.

Magda Ivone Nussbaum

In response to YogaFan

While it is clear that the number and variety of connected devices is exploding, what is less clear is the social impact of this trend.

Optimists would have us believe that the IoT will free us from the mundanities of running a household. You’ll be able to read a book while a driverless car takes you the best route home before arriving home to dinner cooked to perfection in your smart oven.  Pessimists sell us a dystopian vision of an insecure and terrifying world where everything can be hacked – by governments, corporations or other people – including your car, your burglar alarms or even your pacemaker.

YogaFan

In response to Tadeas Economou

It’s predicted that by 2020, 50 billion devices will be connected to the web, from cars and doorbells to your pet dog’s collar and the kitchen stove. Everyday household objects increasingly hold the potential to become, in techno parlance, ‘a gateway to a delta of services’.

While it is clear that the number and variety of connected devices is exploding, what is less clear is the social impact of this trend.

Tadeas Economou

It’s predicted that by 2020, 50 billion devices will be connected to the web, from cars and doorbells to your pet dog’s collar and the kitchen stove. Everyday household objects increasingly hold the potential to become, in techno parlance, ‘a gateway to a delta of services’.

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Helga Breitner

The Internet of Things is transforming every corner of life: the home, the office, city streets and beyond. IoT products give us greater control over door locks, lights and appliances; offer insights into resource consumption habits; streamline business processes; and better connect us to the people, systems and environments that shape our daily lives.

Denny Daskalov

In response to Gunnr Østergård

Blockchain, a form of Distributed Ledger Technology, has been gaining enormous attention in areas beyond its cryptocurrency roots since more or less 2014: blockchain and IoT (the Internet of Things), blockchain and security, blockchain and finance, blockchain and logistics, you name it. 

IBM Blockchain, for instance, already allows to extend (private) blockchain into cognitive Internet of Things. In fact, ultimately it will be the combination of artificial intelligence, IoT and blockchain that will prove most interesting across industries and in myriad possible IoT applications. With blockchain we are pretty much adding to the changing digital infrastructure that powers so many evolutions and impacts so many areas, from analytics to security, in an environment that thus far was centralized.

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