INTERNET OF THINGS WITH ROB VAN KRANENBURG: THE ROAD AHEAD


The road ahead

Rob van Kranenburg, Founder of IoT Council, Ecosystem Manager for EU projects TagitSmart and Next Generation Internet talks about the splinternet, protocols, security, governance, basic income, Robert Reich and millenials.

Jacquette Rollins

In response to Анета Владимирова

It takes smart planning to build a smart city—a seamless synergy of high-tech experts, business visionaries, academics and, above all, forward-thinking civic leaders. Yet before the first sensor is locked in place or the first network switched on, the build must gravitate around the most precious resource of all: its citizens.

Here is an example of a smart city leader: Singapore.  Singapore has tackled its considerable traffic challenges through connected transportation solutions. Its Intelligent Transport System (ITS) has given rise to a pioneering system of electronic road pricing, where open-road tolls rise as traffic surges. ITS also allows for real-time traffic information delivered through GPS-enabled taxis, and it integrates the public transportation structure while also making buses more punctual.

Анета Владимирова

It takes smart planning to build a smart city—a seamless synergy of high-tech experts, business visionaries, academics and, above all, forward-thinking civic leaders. Yet before the first sensor is locked in place or the first network switched on, the build must gravitate around the most precious resource of all: its citizens.

Gugulethu Cerdic Møller

Here are some interesting IoT market estimations:

  • Bain & Company expects annual IoT revenue of hardware and software to exceed $450 billion by 2020.
  • McKinsey & Company estimates IoT will have an $11.1 trillion impact by 2025.
  • IHS Markit believes the number of connected IoT devices will increase 12% annually to reach 125 billion in 2030.
  • Gartner assesses that 20.8 billion connected things will be in use by 2020, with total spend on IoT devices and services to reach $3.7 trillion in 2018.
Bryan Darzi

IoT has evolved from the convergence of wireless technologies, microelectromechanical systems, microservices and the internet. The convergence has helped tear down the silos between operational technology and information technology, enabling unstructured machine-generated data to be analyzed for insights to drive improvements.

Winslow Pecora

The IoT can realize the seamless integration of various manufacturing devices equipped with sensing, identification, processing, communication, actuation, and networking capabilities. Based on such a highly integrated smart cyberphysical space, it opens the door to create whole new business and market opportunities for manufacturing.

Nicolao Barros

In response to Danika Nedbalek

As IoT devices continue to play an increasingly pivotal role in business and everyday life, it's imperative that all smart device manufacturers take the necessary steps to improve security in their design and deployment processes. Keep an eye out for more IoT-driven attacks in the coming year, to see how governments and manufacturers respond.

Danika,

Good point on information security.  Due to the interconnectivity of the IoT, a cyber incident could result in an information breach which affects multiple levels of your business, from the head office, to your customers, and to the supply chain in between. Whether targeted or indirect, cyber incidents could weaken your entire IT security infrastructure. An information breach could cause a loss of revenue and time, could damage your business's reputation and credibility, and could lead to legal challenges. To protect the information on your network, you should control who and what connects to it.

Danika Nedbalek

As IoT devices continue to play an increasingly pivotal role in business and everyday life, it's imperative that all smart device manufacturers take the necessary steps to improve security in their design and deployment processes. Keep an eye out for more IoT-driven attacks in the coming year, to see how governments and manufacturers respond.

Baldur Helgason

Internet of Things is characterized by heterogeneous technologies, which concur to the provisioning of innovative services in various application domains. In this scenario, the satisfaction of security and privacy requirements plays a fundamental role. Such requirements include data confidentiality and authentication, access control within the IoT network, privacy and trust among users and things, and the enforcement of security and privacy policies.

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Helga Breitner

In response to George Waters

The Internet of Things has been with us for a while—it is just that we do not notice it until we need to discuss it.

George,

One of the big targets of the digital age is the city. The combination of technology paired with physical infrastructure and services can simplify the lives of residents. That's the promise of the "smart city." The concept is the result of the ever-expanding Internet of Things, with transportation, utilities, and law enforcement among the many areas being impacted. This is the ideal time for such technology, since more than 60% of the world's population will live in cities by 2050, according to a report from Cisco Systems.

Alex Tetradze

In response to Slobodan Pavlicic

I did not understand how ‘smart bar-codes’ would work.  Are we talking about QR codes and do such codes need the cloud to work?

Slobodan,

Everyone is familiar with barcodes – the black-and-white codes featuring a series of parallel lines that a cashier scans in the checkout line – but QR codes are also becoming widely known and recognized. Both QR codes and barcodes store information about an item or product in a machine-readable format that can be easily scanned with a barcode scanner or, more recently, many smartphones (when equipped with a barcode-scanning app or QR code reader).
 

Slobodan Pavlicic

I did not understand how ‘smart bar-codes’ would work.  Are we talking about QR codes and do such codes need the cloud to work?

arman99

Cool stuff

Rosanne Ostberg

Having heard comparisons between 'pervasive computing' and the 'Internet of Things', I would like to share one definition of the former, courtesy of TechTarget.com: Pervasive computing, also called ubiquitous computing, is the growing trend of embedding computational capability into everyday objects to make them effectively communicate and perform useful tasks in a way that minimizes the end user's need to interact with computers as computers. Pervasive computing devices are network-connected and constantly available.

Aleksey Tyomkin

I am looking for comments on how internet addressing might change in the future in order to accommodate the billions of new devices that will get connected to the IoA in the years to come.

George Waters

The Internet of Things has been with us for a while—it is just that we do not notice it until we need to discuss it.

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