INTERNET OF THINGS WITH ROB VAN KRANENBURG: LIFE IN THE IOT


Life in the IoT

Rob van Kranenburg, Founder of IoT Council, Ecosystem Manager for EU projects Tagitsmart and Next Generation Internet tals about privacies (yes that’s plural!), transition, China, Estonia, ambient intelligence, pervasive computing and Kevin Ashton.

Yoet Stratan

In response to Agnes Maria Fuentes

The Internet of Things is adding another layer to our increasingly complicated world, and it is going to have far-reaching social consequences. The risk of letting this new frontier of connectedness be controlled by technology owners, rather than by the users, poses a clear and present risk, and a significant design challenge.

 To make the IoT work for us, rather than it becoming a self-censoring force in the privacy of our own homes, will take not just technical know-how, but sensitivity to social interactions and a human-centered, empathetic approach. This is where design has a fundamental role to play.

Agnes Maria Fuentes

The Internet of Things is adding another layer to our increasingly complicated world, and it is going to have far-reaching social consequences. The risk of letting this new frontier of connectedness be controlled by technology owners, rather than by the users, poses a clear and present risk, and a significant design challenge.

Gaetano Albertini

In smart cities we see stores that are already using IoT to help monitor stock and improve the customer experience with staff using tablets to provide extra information and sales points. Outside those stores, augmented reality window displays can engage shoppers as they pass and beacon technology can send messages and offers to people’s phones.

Waclaw Piatek

In response to Slobodan Ivanovic

In many countries, we’re already in the early stages of smart motorways that help route traffic efficiently and can help navigate around delays or accidents faster than traditional roads.

When smart cars become common, these roads, connected by 5G networks, will group vehicles for efficiency and reduce driving gaps to improve traffic flow. They can enforce safe driving habits, variable speed limits, and report dangerous behavior. IoT and smart cities will kick in car makers and dealers build future cars based around these systems that are interoperable with each other.

Slobodan Ivanovic

In many countries, we’re already in the early stages of smart motorways that help route traffic efficiently and can help navigate around delays or accidents faster than traditional roads.

Waclaw Piatek

The IoT offers a new way to analyze and measure city life, from detecting if water pipes are leaking, to measuring traffic flows on the roads and understanding if buildings are using energy in the most efficient way. The availability of highly localized weather predictions focused on municipal operations has the potential to mitigate the impact of severe weather on citizens and local infrastructure.

George Waters

A lightbulb that can be switched on using a smartphone app is an IoT device, as is a motion sensor or a smart thermostat in your office or a connected streetlight. An IoT device could be as fluffy as a child's toy or as serious as a driverless truck, or as complicated as a jet engine that's now filled with thousands of sensors collecting and transmitting data back to make sure it is operating efficiently. At an even bigger scale, smart cities projects are filling entire regions with sensors to help us understand and control the environment.

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